What are the physiological changes resulting from a short rest period Part 4

310716 What are the physiological changes resulting from a short rest period Part 4

When designing the program keep in mind the following definitions of rest periods:

  • “Very short rest periods: 1 minute or shorter
  • Short rest periods: 1 to 2 minutes
  • Moderate rest periods: 2 to 3 minutes
  • Long rest periods: 3 to 4 minutes
  • Very long rest periods: 5 minutes or longer”[1]

Varying the length of the rest periods can have a significant effect on the training outcome.

Based on the previous information, it should be clear that the more rest your trainee takes between the sets and exercises the more weight and repetitions can be done at specific percentages of the one repetition maximum. These increases, in both the load and repetitions, which take place for each of the different rest periods, are due to the body’s improved ability to make use of “the bicarbonate and phosphate blood and muscle buffering systems.[2]

The bicarbonate and phosphate blood and muscle buffering systems will steadily improve if the design of the program gradually introduces shorter rest periods.

When designing resistance training programs for your trainee, varying the rest periods has a direct influence on the demands placed upon the metabolic and buffering portions and subsequently the physiological responses to the loads.

Be careful of rapidly reducing the rest periods.

An individual’s body has to adapt to the rest between sets and exercises otherwise, you run the risk of diminishing the quality of the session by overtaxing the metabolic systems ability to keep up with the demands placed upon it. The ultimate result is an inability to move the weight or to do the repetitions.

 

[1] Optimizing Strength Training, Fleck, S. J., Kraemer, W. J., Human kinetics

[2] ibid

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